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    Best midrange all-rounders 2020 - buyer�s guide

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    The search for the best midrange phone ends here. Check out our editors' shortlist in several price categories.

    Since 'midrange' is quite a wide range, we've split it further into price brackets. You could say the �200/250/300 subcategories are spaced too close, but we do find that �50 is a meaningful price difference in this segment. Then there's what we call the 'premium all-rounders' category that sits below the all-out flagships - not exactly cheap, no, but still good value.But that's not even all. It's built with Gorilla Glass 5 on both sides, it has NFC support, and can even control your legacy appliances with its built-in IR emitter.Perhaps the one thing we can come up with that could be an issue to some is the 200g weight - it's not unreasonable, it's just a bit hefty. And yes, an OLED seems like too much to ask in this price bracket.Mind you, in regions where the Redmi Note 8T is not available, the Redmi Note 8 usually is. That's mostly the same phone, only minus NFC and 10g lighter - still an easy recommendation.SpecsThose bits aside (and some photo and video peculiarities), the Realme 5 Pro is a great phone. It's got an excellent battery life coupled with 20W fast charging. We're also very enthusiastic about its primary camera's output across pretty much all shooting scenarios. Then there's the matter that its chipset has plenty of oomph with a particularly powerful GPU for the money.Read full reviewThis one too is missing NFC, so if you absolutely must have the feature for stuff like mobile payments, this Galaxy isn't for you. For the M30s, Samsung has gone with a rather plasticky build, and its glossy back is nigh impossible to keep clean - not strictly a dealbreaker, but a nuisance nonetheless.SpecsIf you look the other way when it comes to these bits, the A50 will reward you with a nice AMOLED display, above-average battery life, and a powerful chipset for the class. And for all the things its camera does wrong, daylight shots are good enough, while portraits and selfies are even better.Read full reviewIt's got flaws too, naturally. While its LCD isn't half-bad, you can grab one of the AMOLEDs above for similar money, and the flipside to the large battery is that the Redmi 8 Pro is a bit chunky. The camera system isn't universally great either, with the less-than-stellar performance from the ultra-wide and macro modules and uninspiring 1080p video.Read full reviewAdd to that the excellent battery life and best chipset outside the 800-series Snapdragons, and the Mi 9T doesn't have any weak points. If anything, its only downside is that certain markets may have the Mi 9T Pro or the Mi 9 proper priced dangerously close to the 9T and those do come with the top-tier Snapdragon 855 chip.Read full reviewThe Realme does outdo the Mi in a couple of areas too, so it may be worth considering how important your phone's haptic feedback is, for example - the one on the X2 is top-notch. Its 64MP main camera is also a step up from the 9T's one, though the ultra wide-angle one isn't as good on the X2 and its telephoto is non-existent.Read full review

    Since 'midrange' is quite a wide range, we've split it further into price brackets. You could say the �200/250/300 subcategories are spaced too close, but we do find that �50 is a meaningful price difference in this segment. Then there's what we call the 'premium all-rounders' category that sits below the all-out flagships - not exactly cheap, no, but still good value.Perhaps the one thing we can come up with that could be an issue to some is the 200g weight - it's not unreasonable, it's just a bit hefty. And yes, an OLED seems like too much to ask in this price bracket.Mind you, in regions where the Redmi Note 8T is not available, the Redmi Note 8 usually is. That's mostly the same phone, only minus NFC and 10g lighter - still an easy recommendation.SpecsRead full reviewSpecsRead full reviewRead full reviewRead full reviewRead full review

    The Realme does outdo the Mi in a couple of areas too, so it may be worth considering how important your phone's haptic feedback is, for example - the one on the X2 is top-notch. Its 64MP main camera is also a step up from the 9T's one, though the ultra wide-angle one isn't as good on the X2 and its telephoto is non-existent.

     


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